The Official Tourism Site of Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan
The Matsumoto Welcomes You website has been renewed and is now Visit Matsumoto (https://visitmatsumoto.com)! We are still working on fixing a few problems and you may notice some links do not work yet. We will fix them as soon as possible. Thank you for your patience and understanding!
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Website Renewal In Progress: We Are Becoming Visit Matsumoto!

Matsumoto Welcomes You is transitioning into a new site, Visit Matsumoto—or visitmatsumoto.com!

The site is being redesigned for a more visually appealing and user-friendly experience. As it is still a work in progress, there are still a few kinks to work out on the new site, but feel free to browse around and try it out! The current Matsumoto Welcomes You site will also stay live for a little while longer so you can continue reference it until the new site is complete.

On Visit Matsumoto, we’ve got a few new and fun pages, including the “Reasons to Visit Matsumoto” page, a Cherry Blossom Forecast, and an “In Depth Articles” that will continue to grow.

The blog will continue on the Visit Matsumoto site from now on, so keep an eye on it there!

The First Wildflowers of Spring Bloom in Matsumoto!

Everyone rejoice because spring is here! Every year around mid-March, spring’s arrival is announced by a dainty, daisy-like flower called fukujuso, which is the first wildflower to bloom in the area.

Fukujuso in the snow

Fukujuso in the snow

In English, fukujuso (Adonis amurensis) is sometimes called amur adonis or amur peasant’s eye. It is a yellow gem that is often found in woodland habitats and pops its head up even through the snow.

Snow is not going to stop these guys!

Snow is not going to stop these guys!

In the Shiga area of northeastern Matsumoto, you’ll find a unique spot where the fukujuso has grown into a huge colony estimated to consist of 500,000 flowers.

Fukujuso on the hilltop

Fukujuso on the hilltop

Here, the blooms grown on a hillside spotted with trees. Fields and rice paddies cover the valley below and tall mountains rise up in the backdrop. When they are in full bloom, the entire hill is painted in gold yellow.

The farms near the Fukujuso habitat

The farms near the Fukujuso habitat

The hillside pathways

The hillside pathways

As mentioned in our March events, to celebrate the coming of the fukujuso blooms, the community here throws a little festival every year during the fukujuso season where you can walk around the flowery hillside and even grab some Japanese festival food or local goodies. This year the festival runs from March 10 to March 21.

Almost in full bloom...

Almost in full bloom…

I went last weekend, but the fukujuso weren’t quite in full bloom yet, due to the colder weather this year. But, with all the warm weather this week, they flowers are going to put on a full show by this weekend! Go check them out if you have the chance.

If you have a car, it only takes 25 to 30 minutes to drive from central Matsumoto. You can also take the Shiga Line bus from Matsumoto Bus Terminal (it runs infrequently, so make sure you check the schedule) to the the Kasekikan (Shiga Fossil Museum) Bus Stop. It’s a 10-minute walk from there. (You can see the bus schedule here, but it’s only available in Japanese)

While you’re at it, enjoy the beautiful countryside scenery and the mountains. I also recommend checking out the Shiga Fossil Museum, as it is filled with all sorts of interesting, fossilized goodies (including a whale skeleton!).

The hill of flowers and mountains in the background

The hill of flowers and mountains in the background

Here is the location of the fukujuso area:

Yayoi Kusama’s All About My Love

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At the Matsumoto City Museum of Art, I had the opportunity to surround myself with vibrant colors, emotive designs, and landscapes that seemed to go on without end. The museum is featuring a three-floor solo exhibition of works by the famed avant-garde artist and Matsumoto native Yayoi Kusama.

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While her pumpkin pieces are particular favorites of mine, a number of other works including those incorporating mirrors and blacklights as well as collages were captivating also. Some of Kusama’s earliest pieces are included in the exhibits, and a short highlight real shows parts of her time in New York. While the museum is always displaying some of her work, this exhibition gives you a more complete picture of who Yayoi Kusama is as an artist.

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Greeted by the giant tulips that bloom outside of the entrance year-round, you’ll also find a giant yellow 3D pumpkin in the museum’s courtyard just for this exhibition.

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A giant eye watches you as you descend the staircase.

Take advantage of the photo opp just to the left of the stairs where you’ll find a cut-out of Kusama. You’ll also find a wide range of polka-dot themed souvenirs as well as towels, playing cards, and dishware designed with her other unique illustrations.

Ticket and Other Information

The exhibition will run until July 22, 2018 (Sun), and you do not need to specify a date when purchasing tickets. The official English website, which includes ticket information, can be found here.

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Artwork on display at AEON Cinema

Soba Off the Beaten Path – Part 3: Watanabe (わたなべ)

Out of all the all the soba places in Matsumoto I’ve been to so far, Watanabe is my favorite. The shop is run by an older lady that must be around 80 years old. Everything is handmade, from the thinly cut soba noodles to the pickles and other mini side dishes that come along with the meal, to the woodcuts on which the menu is written.

You’ll find Watanabe’s shop in a quaint community called Inekoki, which is on the road to Norikura and Kamikochi from Shin-Shimashima. It is an inconspicuous building right as you go around a corner in Inekoki, so if you’re going here by car, it can be easy to drive right past.

Watanabe's exterior

Watanabe’s exterior

There is no paper menu and all items are posted on cut pieces of wood. The dishes served here include chilled soba served on a basket (morisoba), hot soba with grated Japanese yam (yamakake), and soba with raw egg (tsukimi soba). If you want a taste of old, country-style Japanese cooking, try the sobagaki, which is a kind of soba gruel made by stirring buckwheat flour with hot water until forms a thick paste.

Inside, menu is posted on cut pieces of wood!

Inside, menu is posted on cut pieces of wood!

Below is the chilled soba served in a basket, the simplest way to enjoy the subtle flavors of the buckwheat noodles. It comes with a dipping broth for dipping the noodles (which you can later dilute with the thick water from boiling soba and drink like soup). You can get a regular portion for only ¥450 and a larger one for ¥550. The regular portion is smaller compared to other soba shops, so if you have a big appetite, get the bigger one.

Chilled soba on a basket

Chilled soba on a basket

I loved Watanabe’s hot soba noodles. I got the yamakake soba and the grated yam covers the noodles in a deliciously gooey texture as you eat. My favorite part, though, was the broth. It’s not too strong or salt and you can tell it’s homemade and cooked with care.

Hot soba with grated Japanese yam

Hot soba with grated Japanese yam

For something really unique, get the sobagaki. This is an old-fashioned dish that reminds me of a smooth, buckwheat flavored oatmeal. The fun part is that shop lady brings it out right in the pot it was cooked in! You eat it by scooping out portions with a spoon and dipping it in soy sauce garnished with green onions.

Sobagaki served right the pot

Sobagaki served right the pot

Also, all orders come with a tasty side dish or two, usually something made with seasonal vegetables such as pickles.

Different kinds of homemade pickles and another mini side dish

Different kinds of homemade pickles and another mini side dish

Delicious salted cucumber and myoga that we got served in summer

Delicious salted cucumber and myoga that we got served in summer

The inside of the shop is cozy and decorated with a collection of woodcrafts. The soba shop is directly connected to the shop owners home and if you need to use the restroom, you’ll have to go through the sliding doors and through the living room!

Nice and sunny seats

Nice and sunny seats

Hours are 11:00 a.m. to 17:00 p.m. There are no particular closing days.

To get to Watanabe, you can use an (unfortunately) infrequent bus from Hata Station or Shin-Shimashima Station (the Nagawa Line) to the Inekoki Nakamachi bus stop or, of course, by car/taxi.

You can see the bus schedule in Japanese here. Basically, if you are shooting for lunch, you can take the first bus at 9:55 a.m. from Hata Station/10:02 from Shin-Shimashima Station, or the later bus that departs Hata Station at 13:17 or Shin-Shimashima Station at 13:24. (The earlier bus will get you to Inekoki before the shop opens though).

By car, just follow the road into the mountains toward Norikura/Kamikochi (map).

ALPICO Plaza (Formerly Ario) Now Open!

Alpico_plaza

 

Those familiar with the Ario Department Store that closed last year will be happy to hear that the building is reopening with new stores! The basement, 1st, 3rd, 4th, and 7th floors are now open, and the rest of the building will open from April. Tax free shopping will still be available (see stores for details).

floorguide

Delicia, a chain supermarket of good quality, is located in the basement along with a few eating areas and souvenir shops. If you’re catching a bus from the Matsumoto Bus Terminal, you can do last minute shopping there!

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food_court

On the 1st floor you’ll find the ALPICO ticket counter. Open 4:40-21:00/22:00-22:30, there you can purchase tickets both at the counter or via ticket machines. Credit cards are accepted. Their waiting area has 35 seats and supplies electric outlets and Wi-Fi access via ALPICO Free Wi-Fi. If you walk past the counter to the back of the waiting area, you’ll find an entrance to the bus boarding platforms. Buses running to Tokyo, Osaka, and Nagoya as well as more local destinations depart from here.

alpico_ticket_counter

The new shops will include beauty salons, massage parlors, and clothing and shoes stores.
The 3rd floor’s Avail and the 4th floors Shimamura are already open.
The 7th floor still consists of a 100 yen store and a variety of reasonably priced restaurants that include Japanese, Chinese, and Italian cuisines. If you’re really hungry you can have all-you-can-eat dumplings.
Hopefully the rooftop summer beer garden is re-opened as well!

7th floor

 

Stay tuned for updates!

Official Site (Japanese only)

Shirahone Onsen – A Peaceful Getaway at a Hot Springs Resort

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Shirahone’s signature milky white waters

An avid onsen enthusiast, I recently paid a visit to the hot spring village of Shirahone in the mountains of Matsumoto. Although going via public transportation in the winter is a bit more of a challenge, it is still doable. After purchasing my round-trip ticket (available in the ALPICO Plaza/Matsumoto Bus Terminal across the street from Matsumoto Station), I hopped on the Kamikochi Line train bound for Shin-Shimashima Station.

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The ticket to Shirahone costs 3,500 yen and is good for 7 days.

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Board the train from track 7.

Things to Note about Going by Public Transportation

A direct bus leaves from Matsumoto once a day, but departs only in the afternoon, so if you want to make a day trip of your visit, you will need to take the earliest train (7:16 a.m. in the winter) and head back on the 3:50 p.m. bus. Since a lot of visitors come to the area after Kamikochi opens (around mid-April), you will probably have a nicer trip if you visit after that. A few ryokan and the only cafe are closed for the winter. Furthermore, the ryokans that allow day-trip bathing will only allow you to use them until 2:00 p.m. or so. Thus, you will have a bit of time to kill before you catch the bus back to Shin-Shimashima. While there is an information hut next to the Shirahone bus stop, it is fairly old and small and also not very well heated.

The Trip Up

A winter wonderland awaited me. The road was very winding, but the view was superb.

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Watching us from the roadside, a kamoshika or Japanese deer.

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The Shirahone settlement sinks into the valley.

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Arriving at Shirahone Onsen

I stayed on the bus until the last stop, Shirahone Onsen. However, for those visiting for just the day, I recommend getting off one stop sooner at Awa-no-yu.

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A map and guide are posted outside of the information hut (open 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.). The guide indicates what ryokans offer day-visit bathing, when they are open, and how much they cost. Sadly, the board’s information may not be kept entirely up to date, so it’s better to ask before setting out.

Walking to Awa-no-yu

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Fortunately, the previous stop, Awa-no-yu, was only about a 15-minute walk back up the road. Still a part of Shirahone Onsen, there are a few ryokan there that all offer day-visit bathing. I was able to visit two of them. My first stop was the Marui Ryokan‘s Katsura-no-yu. They were kind enough to let me enter a little early. Although the bath was not very large, it was well maintained and included an outdoor portion (possible coed a bath). The natural hot spring waters were the perfect temperature for a nice long soak. Shampoo, conditioner, and body soap were available, but bring your own towel and hairdryer. No lockers were available in the changing room, but the front desk might be willing to keep an eye on your things.

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Katsura-no-yu from below

After a cup of coffee (available for purchase in the lobby along with some other drinks and snacks), I headed over to the inn across the street. The Awa-no-yu Ryokan offers both separate and coed bathing. If you’re just there for the day, you will enter through an entrance around back. Last entry is 1:30 p.m. Medium-size coin lockers and lockers for valuables as well as drink and food vending machines are available in the lobby.

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The women only side has both an indoor and outdoor bath and provides shampoo, conditioner, body wash and hairdryers. Once you wash off, you can cover up and head down the hall to the large outdoor bath. The men’s and women’s entrances are separated, so you can fully submerge yourself before heading out into the open. The water is so cloudy that you can’t see more than a few centimeters down, but I was told that I was allowed to wrap myself in a towel if a preferred.

After trying out all of the baths, it was time leave, so I headed back to the information hut to wait. I lucked out with some nice weather and got to enjoy the scenery along the way. Overall, I had a pleasant, relaxing experience and hope to be back again.

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Yayoi Kusama Special Exhibition and Other March Events

Spring is just around the corner and the cherry blossom will start blooming in April, but in the meantime, why not go check out the exclusive Yayoi Kusama exhibition coming to the Matsumoto Museum of Art?

Yayoi Kusama: All About My Love Exhibition

Exhibition poster

Exhibition poster


An exclusive exhibition in Matsumoto featuring the largest collection (180 pieces) of Kusama’s works to date. Definitely a must-see!

Dates: March 3, 2018 (Sat) to July 22, 2018 (Sun)
Location: Matsumoto Museum of Art (Map)
Tickets: Adults ¥1,200, University/High school students ¥800 (Presale tickets available until March 2 for a discounted price: Adults ¥1,000, University/High school students ¥600)
Official Website: https://kusama2018.com/english

Night Museum at the Matsumoto Museum of Art

Night Museum flyer

Night Museum flyer


The third installment of the museum’s nighttime series. Special extended hours on the first day of Yayoi Kusama’s All About My Love exhibition.

Date: March 3, 2018 (Sat)
Time: 5:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.
Location: Matsumoto Museum of Art (Map)

Shiga Fukujuso Festival

Event flyer

Event flyer

An event celebrating the earliest wildflower, the fukujuso (known as the Amur adonis and pheasant’s eye), to show its blooms in Matsumoto. The festival site is a bit far from central Matsumoto so car is the easiest way to get there. You can also take Matsumoto’s Shiga Line bus to the Kasekikan (Shiga Fossil Museum) Bus Stop from which it’s a 10 minute walk from there (Japanese timetable).

Dates: March 10, 2018 (Sat) to March 21, 2018 (Wed/holiday)
Opening Festival: March 10
Location: Shiga Akanuta Fukujuso Park (map)

Obisha Matsuri at Hotaka Shrine

A 500-year-old Shinto ritual that involves priests shooting arrows at targets with a traditional bow. Takes place at Hotaka Shrine in the neighboring city of Azumino. See more info on Azumino’s event page.

Date: March 17, 2018 (Sat)
Time: Starts at 3:00 p.m.
Location: Hotaka Shrine (map)

Fun with the kids at Alps Park

Alps Park is well-known for having one of the best views of the Japan Alps in Matsumoto, but it is also a great place to visit if you have kids. With the park’s wide range of outdoor playground equipment, petting zoo, and plenty of places to explore nature, kids (and adults!) are going to have a blast at this park!

Weeee!

Weeee!

Of course, for an experience in the “deep nature” of Matsumoto, you’ll probably want to head out into the mountains or Kamikochi, but this park is perfect if your kids (or friend’s kids) are too young yet you still want to have some fun outdoors. (I was with my friend’s less-than-two-year-old toddler, so any hiking was out of the question)

Awesome view of the Japan Alps from Alps Park

Awesome view of the Japan Alps from Alps Park

You can get here by car, bus, or taxi. If you’re taking the bus, use the Alps Park Line bus which you can catch from Matsumoto Bus Terminal by the station. Note that the bus only runs twice a day (departing 10:00 and 14:00), so make sure you plan accordingly, especially for your return trip (Schedule PDF in Japanese)

We parked at the East Parking Lot and at the entrance, we were greeted by a long bridge over a ravine. Continuing on, the park paths are surrounded by trees and views of the surroundings, so it’s nice to come here for simply taking walks or jogging. We caught a glimpse of a couple of pretty wild birds, too!

Bridge over to the park from the parking lot

Bridge over to the park from the parking lot

Park scenery

Park scenery

Info center and rest house

Info center and rest house

For kids, head to the Kids Adventure Plaza (子供冒険広場). It is full of super fun playground equipment, obstacle course, a huge climbing wall that looks like a mountain, and different kinds of slides.

Fun on the playground

Fun on the playground

Roller slide!

Roller slide!

This big play structure below was popular with the kids at the park, as it had different kinds of slides, a wobbly bridge, rope-and-ball swings, and fun obstacles:

Super fun playground equipment

Super fun playground equipment

I personally really like the climbing wall. It was set up with handholds, ropes, ledges, and all kinds of fun ways you could try to make your way up to the top. Climbing would be too dangerous for really small children, but I think later elementary school kids and up could handle it. Not to mention it’s a blast for adults too!

The climbing mountain with all sorts of climbing paths

The climbing mountain with all sorts of climbing paths

Alps Park even has a small zoo that’s free of charge, which includes a petting zoo where the kids can pet goats and guinea pigs. The other animals you can see are monkeys, different kinds of birds of prey, wild boars, horses, and more.

Pet the goats!

Pet the goats!

Guinea pig petting pet

Guinea pig petting pet

The park isn’t very green in the winter, but the view of the mountains tends to be nicer because the air is clearer and there is more snow on the peaks. Still, if you want to enjoy the trees, flowers, and greenery, I’d recommend going in the spring, summer, or fall. This is also an excellent place for cherry blossom viewing!

Besides the things I mentioned in this post, the park also has a nature museum, a huge slide coaster called the Alps Dream Coaster, and several tables where you can enjoy having a picnic.

Soba Off the Beaten Path – Part 2: Kakesu (懸巣)

For part 2 of the Soba Off the Beaten Path series, I’m going to introduce you to Kakesu (懸巣)—a soba shop/Japanese-style diner that really is off the beaten path. In fact, it’s pretty much in the middle of the mountains!

Kakesu is nestled in a narrow valley on the way to Utsukushigahara Highlands in the Tobira Hot Springs area. It sits right next the Hinokinoyu Hot Spring facility, so you can eat before or after you take a dip in the hot spring. After turning off the main road, the way turns into a slightly precarious, one-lane road through the forest in the mountain valley/gorge.

The entrance of Kakesu, with signs advertising its menu

The entrance of Kakesu, with signs advertising its menu

This shop isn’t an exclusive soba specialty restaurant, but rather a kind of Japanese-style family “diner” that serves soba and udon noodles is Kakesu’s main menu items along with other things. What makes it different from other noodle shops is that they use some unique ingredients, such as homemade sunkizuke pickles and local wild mushrooms. I imagine they’ll also have wild mountain herbs/plants in the spring and early summer, too.

By the way, sunkizuke pickles are quite a rare find, as they can only be made in cool climates. They are made with turnip greens that are lactic acid fermented without salt (the same kind of fermentation as sauerkraut, but sauerkraut uses salt). These pickles originate in the Kiso area, but apparently the conditions in Kakesu’s mountain valley are also suitable for making them!

The first time I went to Kakesu I tried their special sunkizuke soba noodle bowls: one included wild mushrooms and the other grated Japanese yam. The pickles have tart flavor due to the way they are fermented, which goes well with the soy sauce-based soup that the noodles are served in. If you are a mushroom fan, definitely give the wild mushroom version a try—the mushrooms are picked from the local forests and have a much deeper flavor than regular, store-bought ones.

Hot wild mushroom and sunkizuke pickle soba noodles

Hot wild mushroom and sunkizuke pickle soba noodles

I’m also a huge fan of tororo, or grated Japanese yam. It has a pleasantly gooey, slimy texture that coats the noodles as you slurp them down and gives the soup a thicker texture.

Hot sunkizuke pickle and tororo (Japanese yam) soba noodles

Hot sunkizuke pickle and tororo (Japanese yam) soba noodles

If you like tempura, then you’ll enjoy the kakiage soba topped with a big piece of kakiage tempura, which is made by frying various types of julienned vegetables together.

Hot kakiage soba

Hot kakiage soba

You can also get the above dishes with fat udon noodles instead of soba. Another dish I have my eyes set on are the hot udon noodles with wild mushrooms in a miso-based soup!

Besides, noodles, Kakesu has other kinds of daily specials and other menu items, including Japanese diner classics like oyakodon (chicken and egg rice bowls), tonkatsu (fried pork cutlet), and grilled fish sets.

One delicious special was the mini hotpot with wild mushrooms and suiton (simple flour dumplings). It was packed with tender, yet pleasantly chewy dumplings and tons of vegetables along with the mushrooms!

Suiton dumpling and wild mushroom hotpot

Suiton dumpling and wild mushroom hotpot

I also recommend the hearty gyusuji (tender beef tendon) stew and butamotsu (pork offal) stew combo. The beef stuew practically melts in your mouth and the pork offal are very tender. It comes with a big serving of rice, soup, and some homemade pickles, too.

Gyusuji (tender beef tendon) stew and butamotsu (pork offal) stew combo

Gyusuji (tender beef tendon) stew and butamotsu (pork offal) stew combo

Kakesu has a very at-home feel, as the family that runs it often have their little kids in the shop with them and there are all sorts of random items around the shop like wooden trinkets, temari balls, and a big collection of manga (which you are free to browse through!). There is both table-and-chair seating as well as tatami seating.

Kakesu's table seats

Kakesu’s table seats

The manga and trinket collection in front of the kitchen window

The manga and trinket collection in front of the kitchen window

One of the shop's cute and random wood-carved owls

One of the shop’s cute and random wood-carved owls

The down side is that getting to Kakesu is not that easy unless you have a car (map). It is 14 kilometers from Matsumoto Station so you will need to take a taxi, rent/have a car, have a friend with a car, or very strong legs and a good bicycle. On the other hand, since the Hinokinoyu Hot Spring is right next to Kakesu you can make a day out of visiting the hot spring and then getting a nice, hot bowl delicious soba afterwards. (Hinokinoyu has an amazing outdoor bath with a view of the gorge, by the way, so it’s well worth checking out! And, it’s only 300 yen.) During the summer you can also go hiking in the area or visit the Utsukushigahara Highland.

Kakesu’s hours are 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Hinokinoyu Hot Spring’s hours are 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Soba Off the Beaten Path – Part 1: Inakaya (田舎屋)

While there are soba noodle shops galore in central Matsumoto, there are some great options you can find off the beaten path, too. Since these shops usually aren’t trying to cater to the troves of tourists coming to the city, you can rest assured you’ll have an authentic experience.

The first place I want to talk about is Inakaya (田舎屋), a soba shop located straight east from Matsumoto Castle on the way to the Utsukushigahara Onsen hot springs area and not too, too far off the beaten path (see below for access info).

Inakaya's entrance

Inakaya’s entrance

I’m a little partial to Inakaya because it’s the first soba shop I visited when I moved to Matsumoto, but they definitely serve some high quality soba! They make their soba noodles by hand using soba flour from the Kaida Highland area in Kiso, Nagano and you can see the soba noodle making room on your right when you walk in the door.

Inakaya serves a variety of both chilled soba and hot soba in soup, and like many classic soba shops, you can get a side of crispy tempura on the side. The simplest way to enjoy the soba is the plain chilled soba which has a great texture and delicious, subtle flavor. It gets dipped into a concentrated dipping soup (tsuyu), which after you’re done eating, gets diluted with the thick water from boiling the noodles so you can drink it like soup. Another, more luxurious option is to get the chilled soba with the duck dipping soup, which includes a small, but tasty piece of roast duck.

Chilled soba with duck dipping soup

Chilled soba with duck dipping soup

There is also a hot version of the duck soba noodles:

Hot soba noodles with duck

Hot soba noodles with duck

If you’re a fan of tofu (in particular, fried tofu), then you’ll love the hot tanuki soba (yes, that would be the same tanuki from Super Mario!) which features a big, fat, juicy piece of fried tofu in the soup. Similarly the hot kizami soba has slices of fried tofu with green onion in the soup.

Tanuki soba noodles

Tanuki soba noodles

Kizami soba noodles

Kizami soba noodles

Other types of soba are sansai soba noodles which are served with wild mountain herbs and plants, soba with grated Japanese yam, and tempura soba.

The shop itself has a cozy, country-style atmosphere with a wood-burning stove in the middle of the restaurant and old Japanese folk masks hanging on the walls. Most of the seating is on tatami mats with low tables, but there are also a couple of regular tables with chairs.

Inakaya's wood burning stove

Inakaya’s wood burning stove

An old "otafuku" mask on the wall

An old “otafuku” mask on the wall

The good news is that if you want to try Inakaya’s excellent soba, it’s not too hard to get to!

The shop is only about 2 kilometers from Matsumoto Castle, so you could easily get there by bicycle in 15 minutes or in 30 minutes by foot. From Matsumoto Station it’s 2.7 kilometers, so it’ll take a few more minutes from there. It is also accessible by bus: just take the Utsukushigahara Onsen line bus to the Souza bus stop in front of the Delicia Supermarket (this bus departs both from Matsumoto Station and Matsumoto Castle/City Hall).

Shop Hours: 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

I’ll be posting about a couple more soba shops you can find “off the beaten path,” so keep an eye out! 😉


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